An analysis of the topic of the house setting for a prank

Have a suggestion to improve this page? To leave a general comment about our Web site, please click here Share this page with your network. Each year and in each class students bemoan the idea of having to read Shakespeare.

An analysis of the topic of the house setting for a prank

Searching for streaming and purchasing options Common Sense is a nonprofit organization. Your purchase helps us remain independent and ad-free. Get it now on Searching for streaming and purchasing options A lot or a little? The parents' guide to what's in this book.

Educational Value Anne Frank's beautifully written diary is a teaching tool on multiple levels. First, it offers a kid's eye view of World War II, written innocently and meaningfully by a Jewish teen whose family is forced into hiding during the Nazi occupation of Holland.

Anne follows the events of the war via radio news broadcasts and information shared by visiting friends, as she and her family anxiously await the allies' invasion of continental Europe. Second, the book is enormously telling about the inner life of girls in their early teens. Anne articulately describes her own emotional and physical feelings as she matures, including her struggles to get along with her parents, the beginnings of her sexuality and desire for love, and her wish to make a difference in a troubled world.

On another level, Anne also devotes her time to studying history, literature, mathematics, and languages though she admits she doesn't care for algebra. Her family places a high value on education, and her father becomes her teacher as well while they are in hiding.

Anne writes to relieve her stress, share with a "friend," and unburden her feelings, repeatedly referring to a quote: Anne writes movingly about the unjust treatment of Jews, and her goal of helping make the world a better place after the war. Equally inspiring is the relationship between the families in the secret annex and the friends outside who protect and feed them.

The Franks also continue to observe their faith and other family rituals while in hiding. Most remarkable is just how normal Anne is, in spite of everything, which in itself offers a reassuring message of resilience for teens and parents of teens.

In the book, she shines through as a very normal teen with talent, spirit, and a hunger for learning. Adults in Anne's diary argue and struggle with each other -- we can only imagine their stress and anxiety -- and Anne is often at odds with the grownups, but all of these people, and their friends on the outside, inspire great admiration for keeping two families alive under extreme duress for two years.

The adult Anne most appreciates is her father, who seems quiet, kind, and intelligent.

Republican pair apparently pose as communists to make Democratic donation : politics

Violence Anne and her family can hear air raids and shooting. They also regularly receive news of the war, and of friends and acquaintances being taken away to concentration camps, though it is not clear how much they know about what happens in the camps.

The threat of violence is always present; the warehouse that contains the secret annex is invaded by burglars several times, bringing not only immediate danger, but the fear that the families will be seen and reported to the German police.

An analysis of the topic of the house setting for a prank

Sex Anne writes about her growing sexual feelings; she says that sometimes she wants nothing but time alone to feel her breasts and listen to the beating of her own heart. She also mentions having once kissed a girlfriend and having asked that friend if they should feel each other's breasts, but the friend refused.

Anne also writes a lot about her feelings of "longing" for Peter Van Daan, a teen boy whose family shares the secret annex with the Franks.

An analysis of the topic of the house setting for a prank

She and Peter embrace and share their first kisses. Van Daan smokes cigarettes, and the Franks' friends on the outside talk about drinking wine at parties.

What parents need to know Parents need to know that Anne Frank's diary is a singular, moving look at World War II from a young girl's perspective.

The Franks, along with another family, the Van Daans, hide in order to avoid capture during the German occupation of Holland.

Aided by friends on the outside, Anne and the others spend two years in the "secret annex": While war rages outside, Anne is a normal teen, thinking at least as much about friends, and boyfriends, and how her parents annoy her, as she does about issues of the day.

She is a remarkably clever, thoughtful narrator, and her diary is as entertaining as it is a significant historical document. The Diary of a Young Girl is required reading for many middle-schoolers, and it will be rightfully upsetting to many of those readers.

Though the events within the diary offer only a glimpse of the horrors inflicted on Jewish people by the Nazis, there is a disturbing element of fear throughout.

What we as readers know about what happened to Jews outside the world of the book, and what happened to Anne after the book ends, is inescapable in the experience of reading Anne's diary.

Form and Content

Many editions of Anne Frank's diary include an Afterword, explaining the events of World War II and the fate of Anne and the other inmates of the secret annex. Stay up to date on new reviews. Get full reviews, ratings, and advice delivered weekly to your inbox.Oct 14,  · HOUSE is a factual narrative detailing the construction of a moderately expensive single-family house near Amherst, Massachusetts.

Anne Frank's beautifully written diary is a teaching tool on multiple levels. First, it offers a kid's eye view of World War II, written innocently and meaningfully by a Jewish teen whose family is forced into hiding during the Nazi occupation of Holland.

Blog Archive Start Main Character Growth Margo has to start believing in herself. She must begin to be comfortable with her age, and accept that Bill loves her for who she is, on the stage and off.

May 15,  · A video is never guaranteed to go viral, but a few factors make it significantly more likely. In the first few months of , viral videos covered all kinds of topics: a serious look at female. For the prank, the juniors all chipped in five dollars to pay for a male stripper and had the stripper pose as Dr.

William Morse and give a speech until given the cue to rip his clothes off and dance. The following analysis reveals a comprehensive look at the Storyform for All About Eve. Unlike most of the analysis found here—which simply lists the unique individual story appreciations—this in-depth study details the actual encoding for each structural item.

The Adventure of the Cardboard Box is one of the 56 short Sherlock Holmes stories written by Sir Arthur Conan tranceformingnlp.com is the second of the twelve in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes in most British editions of the canon, and second of the eight stories from His Last Bow in most American versions.

The story was first published in The Strand Magazine in

Chapter Summaries | LOOKING FOR ALASKA